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Thread: The new world of car price appreciation

  1. #1
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    Cool The new world of car price appreciation

    I’ve spent the last 35 years using man-maths and other financial manipulation to justify the deprecation I’ve suffered in the various tasty cars I’ve ‘invested’ in, but those days appear to be over. Not only are nice cars being initially offered at higher prices than pre-COVID and selling far quicker than before, in many instances the prices are actually being marked up rather than marked down.
    This M240i is up 2k from 28k to 30k - m240i https://www.donedeal.ie/cars-for-sal...m240i/25653881
    This Porsche Cayman PDK 2DR V6 2.9 was put up at 30k but that’s been increased to 33k https://www.donedeal.ie/cars-for-sal...nth-w/26313005
    There are plenty of other examples.
    Is this a new long-lasting positive trend that will benefit everyone or a ponzi investment bubble?
    Last edited by Peterboxster; 29-10-2020 at 10:36 AM.

  2. #2
    Is there any benefit for a dealer by valuing their stock higher if we do indeed suffer a major economic crash? Also the m240 link doesn't work for me?
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  3. #3
    As far as I am concerned its a ponzi scheme for anything modern and mass produced no matter how interesting it may seem. Classics and supercars / rare exotics maybe but beyond that their value is ultimately only going one way in my uneducated opinion.
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  4. #4



    I'd wager the supply of enthusiast cars to the Irish market is mostly through the used market and through the UK. That's about to be switched off on January 1st, or at least everything is about to get 20% more expensive.

    On top of that, people are spending more time at home. Those of us lucky enough to still be working are commuting less. This has led to glut of diesel commuterwagens sitting in yards across the country (my own included) depreciating and not earning their keep, and their owners wondering if the spin to the office twice a week could be done for the same financial outlay (compared five times a week last year) in a Cayman...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bazg2 View Post
    Is there any benefit for a dealer by valuing their stock higher if we do indeed suffer a major economic crash? Also the m240 link doesn't work for me?
    I've corrected that link. There may be some benefit in higher value stock, but to be fair to dealers, the stuff is selling, so this appears to be consumer driven.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dimitri View Post



    I'd wager the supply of enthusiast cars to the Irish market is mostly through the used market and through the UK. That's about to be switched off on January 1st, or at least everything is about to get 20% more expensive.

    On top of that, people are spending more time at home. Those of us lucky enough to still be working are commuting less. This has led to glut of diesel commuterwagens sitting in yards across the country (my own included) depreciating and not earning their keep, and their owners wondering if the spin to the office twice a week could be done for the same financial outlay (compared five times a week last year) in a Cayman...
    Yep, I'd say you've pretty much nailed it. The big question is whether this will hold up into 2021 or could it reverse

  7. #7
    The whole brexit thing has everyone worried about prices next year and imports getting more expensive. The market for the performance second hand cars has a bunch of people looking to avoid that increase and buying now.
    Personally I think its a wee bubble and post brexit things will drop again.
    The longer term economic impact of COVID and then brexit on top of it will hit next year and prices will drop. Again imo and I could be completely wrong. I just can't see the price rises sustainable.

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  8. #8
    Caymans are up quite a bit in the UK, no doubt due to the 'no commute' effect that dimitri references. I also believe there to be a YOLO factor in folks buying fun cars, as if the pandemic was a brush-with-death experience that has led people to say era sod it, why not. Plus the post-transition period Brexit matter is looming too. So yeah, supply and command.

    If it's any consolation I see some car markets in the UK going soft - MX5s for example. My hypothesis there is that they are the sportscar for the working man or woman but with Covid/Brexit biting they're also the first to hit the market.
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  9. #9
    Maybe its that most of my buds aren't petrol heads but lots are well paid or own their own business just by nature of living in a nice coastal area on de northside of dublin. Many would have the LR Disco, RR sport, 5 series, Merc etc. Not pertrol head stuff but flash motors by normal standards and they are all looking at EV.

    The market for a 30k Cayman I would think is small so i think this perceived jump is opportunistic and it could also be to bump up VRT rebate on export as I guess the clock must be ticking on cars going out also?? Of course putting up the asking price doesn't mean he will sell it for any more than he was going to accept at 28k but it might make the buyer think he got a better deal.

    I personally wouldn't be rushing to buy now in Ireland. I also think that anyone serious about cars has to be in the process of already importing from the UK to beat the Dec 31 deadline. Once that demand is filled I think prices will stabalise here and may drop here as many will have secured what they want.
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  10. #10
    The other side of the market that I think is a little ignored, might be the "boomer factor" - all the action is focused on stuff from the 80s onwards. It's understandable - the cars are more useable from that point on, it hits all the current nostalgia/zeitgeist buttons, but I can't help think the pre-1979 classic market could be unpredictable. Sure - really desireable or blue chip classics won't really go down - your Escorts, Lotus Elans, Alfa 105s, Land Rovers, E-Types, Ferraris etc. but what about all the other stuff? The lads who own all that stuff because it was their nostalgia purchases are all getting on, or worse, dying off. I think we could see a lot of this stuff re-enter the market - lads wanting to trim down collections that they don't have the energy too look after any more, or being sold on by families after the owner has passedon.

    Maybe I'm totally off on this, but I think those older classics - non TR Triumphs, MGs, Fiat 126 etc. might be a good avenue for someone looking for an affordardle and insurable fun car in the next while, provided you enter with an open mind, realistic expectations and aren't locked into "I need 300bhp" to have fun. The only things I see apprecating big time in that pre 79 age group is JDM stuff which was relatively unloved by the old guard classic community, but embraced by the younger generation that can't get enough retro Datsuns and the like.

    Either way, I think motoring here could get a bit grim. Needing CO2 certs made JDM imports a lot of hassle (but if some enterprising type could sort this out, there might be a market for things like grey import Honda S660s) and UK imports - who knows where that's going. Even with the best Brexit outcome of no change, ever more puntive VRT on new imports is slowing that down too.
    Last edited by crank_case; 29-10-2020 at 01:12 PM.

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