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Thread: Ionity's new EV charge pricing... is making a V8 make sense

  1. #1

    Ionity's new EV charge pricing... is making a V8 make sense

    Ionity, owned by the German car manufacturers and is building a very impressive European charger network, has announced its new pay per use pricing at a mere 79c per kWh. That translates to about €17-€24 per 100km which compares quite nicely to the roughly €20 per 100km that it costs to drive a 5.5l V8 petrol.

    Details here: https://ionity.eu/where-and-how.html#pricing

    Someone somewhere must have hit his or her head because surely... the idea is to get people to switch to EVs if you're a manufacturer supported charger network? I'm guessing maybe that the manufacturers will somehow bundle in Ionity with the purchase of the car just like Tesla does with the superchargers but still eventually you will need to pay once off the initial deal.

    The good news is that this has created a brilliant business case for driving around in a V8. I didn't exactly expect that in the midst of a climate crisis.
    I'm with the resistance

  2. #2
    Senior Member Marlow's Avatar
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    We only have 4 Ionity charge locations in Ireland (3 in the UK, matter of fact).

    But I don't see anyone using them, unless they're really stuck, if that is what they are going to do.

    ESB is 27c on fast chargers for those with sub and 31c pay as you go.

    But yes .. with that pricing a typical charge session (which is 50 kWh looking at plugshare stats) goes from 8 EUR fixed price to about 40 EUR.

    /M

    On a trail somewhere .... not far from being stuck.
    Last edited by Marlow; 17-01-2020 at 12:50 AM.

  3. #3
    Tesla superchargers are ~30c around Europe (varies slightly from country to country). I always thought that Ionity's model of flat €8 per session is strange. I guess they count on all those new Taycan Turbo S owners

    Sent from my Nexus 9 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    I read an article about another high speed charger crowd that is starting a rollout and they said that 350kW chargers are very expensive to install because they require their own substation and a direct connection to the grid and users should expect to pay prices similar to petrol. I’m sure Ionity is facing the same reality.

    But you know, as a consumer do I give a toss? No I don’t really. If they want adoption they need to suck up the rollout cost and take a longer view otherwise this whole EV thing could die a death. Which maybe is the intention, who knows...
    I'm with the resistance

  5. #5
    Senior Member Marlow's Avatar
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    Ionity's competition in the supercharger sphere and also Tesla themselves charge around 30c/kWh.

    So the 79c indeed are a bit far fetched.

    Plus their chargers don't work half the time.

    /M

    On a trail somewhere .... not far from being stuck.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by DMZ View Post

    But you know, as a consumer do I give a toss? No I don’t really. If they want adoption they need to suck up the rollout cost and take a longer view otherwise this whole EV thing could die a death. Which maybe is the intention, who knows...
    Who knows what the grand plan is. If I remember correctly Ionity is joint venture between BMW, VW and Daimler...

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  7. #7
    Senior Member Marlow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wcooba View Post
    Who knows what the grand plan is. If I remember correctly Ionity is joint venture between BMW, VW and Daimler...

    Sent from my Nexus 9 using Tapatalk
    Funny side note ... an e-Golf can max charge at 40 kW

    /M

    On a trail somewhere .... not far from being stuck.

  8. #8
    If you change at home anyway, then these are just to extend the odd journey or save you in a pinch.

    As for the needing their own substation and stuff. I'm not sure why the large supermarkets like Tesco Extras aren't being used. They usually have three phase and the required electrical gubbins in site, but I'm not an electrician.

  9. #9
    Senior Member KevC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crank_case View Post
    If you change at home anyway, then these are just to extend the odd journey or save you in a pinch.

    As for the needing their own substation and stuff. I'm not sure why the large supermarkets like Tesco Extras aren't being used. They usually have three phase and the required electrical gubbins in site, but I'm not an electrician.
    Capacity. These chargers require a lot of juice and there is rarely enough spare capacity in the incoming line to add in a charging station without at least uprating it.

  10. #10
    ..in another sign of the times, I saw an AA "Electric Vehicle Support" van for the first time during the week. Presumably it just has a big diesel generator in the back, but it's reassuring to know it's out there I guess ..

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