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Thread: Anybody here speak Hypermile ?

  1. #1

    Anybody here speak Hypermile ?



    Honda Civic 2.2L iCDTi FE Techniques

    FAS’ing in the iCDTi appears to work as expected. When speaking with a technology lead of Honeywell about the latest Euro diesel turbo’s and how the average driver treats them, he mentioned most including him and his wife just shut them down. Honeywell was not seeing warranty issues with the 7.5 million they have on the road overseas to date that I remember.

    P&G’ing in this thing is a dream. She will eat anything alive other then an Insight that I have driven to date. A Prius pilot using P&G can compete but it does not stand a chance with similar quality of drivers behind the windscreen of each. Do you want to go down to 12, 20 or 25 mph with the top end at 25, 30 or 40 mph? She will give you 100 + as shown below.

    EPS during a Glide. This European Civic is EPS equipped. When starting off on a down slope in N with the car booted up, (those that you can get it to roll down anyway), you will be without PS which is expected. About 10 seconds into the powerless glide, the EPS comes to life and anyone that has experienced a PS to non-PS or back transition while in a turn knows it arrives unexpectedly and is definitely unwelcome. Nothing most hypermilers have not experienced in an EPS equipped hybrid before but you do have to understand the EPS’ shortcomings while using an advanced technique is all.

    Acceleration and steady state cruise. If there is nobody behind; you can bring her up through 6th gear without ever having to touch the accelerator pedal with an easy release of the clutch! This thing has unbelievable pull from down low and this trick is something I would never have expected. Pretty good FE while performing this little trick as well Remember however that 5th and 6th is where the big numbers come from on the highway.

    After a slow accel through the lower gears up to about 55 kph, place her into 5th, peg and attempt to hold the 6 LED throughout the rest of the accel. This allows you to hold a 2L - 3L/100 km range per the instantaneous. Once up to a steady state target speed in 6th, keep the ECO LED’s pegged and hold the 2L/100 km by DWL and DWB until a non-DWL cable climb is encountered and your minimum target speed has been breached. Once you have crested with no down slope relief, re-accelerating back up to your high end target while holding a 2 - 3L/100 km maximum appears to be the most efficient method for lower speed highway travel. Because she is a pure lean-burner, there is no NOx purge as there is in an Insight 5-speed or lean-burn capable HCH-I. What a joy it was not having to counteract a NOx purge cycle.

    The Civic iCDTi appears to have 3 efficiency modes and all appear to be related to the 3 sets of ECO LED’s shown next to the Speedometer. 6-LED’s lit appears to show the iCDTi running on a single - low load – max FE - tuned swirl intake port and the highway numbers while DWL are between 1.9 and 2.9 L/100 km while cruising between 47 and 55 mph. With 4 LED’s lit during light accel’s, she will hold between 3 and 4L/100 km with an occasional peak of 5L/100 km. When you drop down to just 2 LED’s during a faster accel, 6 - 10L/100 km or more is the nasty result. After realizing the ECO lights may mean more then just a lava lamp to peg for max FE, I thought back to that intake port tricks that Honda designed into the iCDTi. When pulling out all the stops, concentrate on keeping those ECO lights pegged through long up hill’s and either going into Fuel cut on the longer downhill’s or holding just 1L/100 km while the iFCD begins its dance while on the highway while DWL. Above 55 mph is where you begin to lose the 5th and 6th LED and you pop up over 3L/100 km.

    For the LS and MS P&G sections, I was using 3 ranges in traffic with beyond Prius deadly results. In an 18 – 45 kph mostly unmolested P&G and/or stop and crawls, using 2nd and 3rd appears to work extremely well. A clutch start at 18 kph and run 2nd up to 1,100 – 1,150 RPM. A very fast shift to 3rd and run that up to ~ 1,250 RPM’s at ~ 44/45 kph, then FAS. This yielded as low as 1.6L/100 km (147 mpg) but she mostly held onto 138 mpg after ~ 10 miles and even after the ¾ - 1 mile long blast to 65 mph.

    For the 24 – 55 kph stop and crawls, 3rd and 4th work best. A clutch start at 24 kph and run 3rd up to ~ 1,350 RPM. A very fast shift to 4th and run that up to 1,400 RPM’s with a FAS following yielded as low as 2.0L/100 km (118 mpg) but she mostly held onto 2.1L/100 km or 112 mpg.




    Chaps - First time in a long time I've read a car technical article that has left me close to bewildered. Started to look up the acronyms, but even when I found them I was little the wiser. Anybody able to decipher the bolded text ones, and also perhaps explain what they mean to the rest of us non hypemiling mortals ?
    Last edited by -alan-; 07-11-2018 at 01:07 AM.

  2. #2
    P&G is Pulse & Glide.
    Rapid acceleration to a particular speed, followed by a period of coasting.

    I'd say EPS is Electronic Power Steering.

    FAS has something to do with stop/start technology or techniques. I just can't pin that one down though.

  3. #3
    It all sounds like and awfully boring and convoluted way of driving a car.

  4. #4
    DWL is driving with load. In other words, trying to keep the engine load as low as possible.
    DWB is driving without using brakes, or trying to use them as little as possible
    FAS is Forced auto stop, basically coasting with the engine off
    D-FAS is Draft-Assisted FAS. Coasting with engine off while drafting another vehicle
    LS low speed
    MS medium speed
    Last edited by Mark F; 07-11-2018 at 10:06 AM.

  5. #5
    Thanks guys.

    Have to go and figure what that all actually means in practice now. The bit about the engine ports and mapping being tuned for maximum efficiency at particular points is a new one on me. Fairly obvious when you think about it, but I hadn't figured out how to take full advantage in real world driving.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tango View Post
    It all sounds like and awfully boring and convoluted way of driving a car.
    Sounds more complex than the pilot handling notes for an SR71, albeit about 2000mph slower and perhaps more engine noise
    TBH - despite having the fairly big 2.2 engine in a small body, the daysul driving experience seems to be pretty sh*te. In the words of his holiness JC, there never yet was a car that has been improved by fitting a diesel engine - and thats true in spades for the Civic. The only satisfaction left is in milking every last cent out of the thing in terms of buying less fuel, and paying less tax.
    Last edited by -alan-; 07-11-2018 at 01:34 PM.

  6. #6
    That's probably the first ever car review, if not Honda review, I stopped reading after the first sentence.

  7. #7
    I get that. If you'd read on a bit further though you'd probably have discovered it's not a car review

    Y'know it still never ceases to amaze me how broad a church the whole petrolhead/gearhead thing is. The fact that there are obsessives out there who have developed a whole sub-culture and lingo around 'saving fuel'. We all do it to a degree, but things like drafting in the wake of larger vehicles, with a dead engine to try to save a few bob on fuel take it to an entirely different level.

    Have to admire their dedication 'in pursuit of excellence' in the field all the same.

  8. #8
    Ì like to do it the odd time but not to the point of being nerdy about it, it also seems a bit dangerous to be cutting off the engine while driving, do you not lose your break servo? not the best idea while tucked close to a truck. I just like finding the right point to turn off my cruise control when approaching my exit of the motorway so I don't have to brake.


    Does it make more sense to put a car in neutral when coasting or leave it in 6th?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by fez View Post
    Ì like to do it the odd time but not to the point of being nerdy about it, it also seems a bit dangerous to be cutting off the engine while driving, do you not lose your break servo? not the best idea while tucked close to a truck. I just like finding the right point to turn off my cruise control when approaching my exit of the motorway so I don't have to brake.


    Does it make more sense to put a car in neutral when coasting or leave it in 6th?
    Friend of mine tested it on a Beemer he had. Think it was a 640d gran coupe or some sort. He did his commute back to back for two weeks with the coasting settings on and off, and he got better mpg with the car in gear.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by fez View Post
    Does it make more sense to put a car in neutral when coasting or leave it in 6th?
    Not sure what you mean by coasting - but if it's freewheeling, neutral used less fuel as there's no engine braking, and you'll travel further from any given speed.

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