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Thread: 25' x 30' Steel Garage. To Galvanize or not to Galvanise

  1. #1

    25' x 30' Steel Garage. To Galvanize or not to Galvanise

    Hi.

    I'm getting ready to order a 25' x 30' steel garage. I'm going fro 12' high side walls so I can get a lift in at some stage. At first I was going for one roller door at gable end but have since decided two roller doors would be much better. My main issue now is that a fully galvanized frame is costing an extra €1000. Which pushes me over my budget as I hadn't allowed for VAT in my original budget. D'oh!
    Have been told i could paint the frame afterwards which seems like a pain in the balls. But don't see how I could paint between the frame and the sheeting.
    Any advice?
    I'm living in hope that people say it's fine to not galvanize the frame.

  2. #2
    Paint it before it's erected, surely it'll be delivered a few days before it's put up.

    Do you really need 12' at the eaves, you'll have 15 or 16 at the ridge. I have a Shannette 30'x15' with 10' eaves, 12' at the ridge, and I can fully lift a car even with the bonnet open

    lift 3.jpg

    Droping it a couple of feet may allow enough cash for galv?

  3. #3
    You can buy galvo spray and DIY.
    Itll never rot regardless

  4. #4
    You can buy galvo spray and DIY.
    Itll never rot regardless

  5. #5
    Id not worry. Save your dosh

  6. #6
    Hi triumph
    That a fine setup,did you use kingspan insulated panels,are they worth the extra money?


    Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by whirsk View Post
    Hi triumph
    That a fine setup,did you use kingspan insulated panels,are they worth the extra money?
    Picked the shed up off DD in 08, secondhand Shanette job, electric roller door and 50mm Kingspan cladded both sides, 11mx5m so it's long enough for two cars. It was a bit of a steal so I can't complain but a bit more width would have been good. Bit of a nightmare transporting the two 5mx4m gables.

    The insulatded sheeting is quite a bit dearer but can't comment as to whether it's worth the extra cash, what I have done on another shed is put chicken wire under roofers felt and then sheeted, much better than that non-drip rubbish, but it depends on your roofing material as it works best with timber purlins.

    If I was to go again I'd put up a steel A-frame using 7" RSJs, blocks/mass concrete up 5', sheeted to the eaves and roof as above. Strong, gurrier proof and dry...

  8. #8
    Thanks triumph
    Did you put any dampproofing in concrete base when pouring?

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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by whirsk View Post
    Thanks triumph
    Did you put any dampproofing in concrete base when pouring?

    Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk
    Its best to pour a floor into a shed...with a dpc underneath.
    Last edited by Derv; 17-09-2017 at 06:55 PM.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by whirsk View Post
    Thanks triumph
    Did you put any dampproofing in concrete base when pouring?

    Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk
    Poured a 6"x12" ring-beam, to sit the shed on, bring levels up with 804 or similar, line with DPC making sure you've at least 8" of concrete where the lift will go, sit 4"x2" timbers on their sides along the top of ring-beam 4" inside the internal dimensions of the shed.

    It's now dead easy to power float the floor (well worth it) as the float just slides over the timber. When the shed is up fill the gap between floor and walls with a strong mix keeping the DPC up the wall as you go to be cut off later.

    Flooring this way means the inside levels are higher than where the outside walls meet the ground/ring-beam. I put a piece of 2" angle iron along the floor where the door ope is for a hard wearing square edge.

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