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Thread: Why am I soft in the middle when...

  1. #351
    Good man, that's great going.

    This is the video https://youtu.be/J5fYP7DrZjw

    Also look into food calorie density. Basically you can eat a teaspoon of Nutella or a sack of carrots. Same calories but one of em will actually fill your belly and you can eat them in whatever quantities you want.
    Sounds like you're doing it properly anyway, gradually cutting weight but maintaining power and feeling good on the bike. That's what it's all about.

  2. #352
    Quote Originally Posted by bloke View Post
    I'd be in Foyler's camp wrt running. Not that I'd blanket dictate to anyone but it's certainly not for me and most everyone I know who does any bit of running is constantly carrying niggles and pains and aches. Apart from the fact that I find running interminably boring I'd be terrified that I'd do a knee or an ankle which would subsequently keep me off my bike and confine me to the couch. -You're probably right that proper research into proper technique and stretching and warm down diligence is the best approach but there's no doubt in my mind that lower impact sports such as cycling or swimming are a safer bet for the middle-aged second-winder.
    Cycling's low impact - but no denying there's a risk of an off, either on-road or off-road which can easily curtail you every bit as much as running. Still fkit - life's an inherently risky business

    Quote Originally Posted by Murakami View Post
    What kind of HR zone did you run in?

    With you on running btw, fell off a few ladders before lockdown and destroyed knee. Which then became a lower back thing mixed with a shoulder thing.

    @foyler: Totally disagree with "no man or woman over 40 should ever find themselves running on the road". We need to look after our bodies more as we grow older, more flexibility and mobility work. That's what really does people in.
    Agree totally on the flexibility and mobility work. Kinda tough though, because you never feel like you've had a 'proper' work out.

    My max HR is about 174. On a 30-40 minute run I'd try to keep it down to about 150. Find it hard to go lower as I'd be nearly walking. On the bike, I'd struggle to hold it over 130 for any length of time without the legs giving up. Maybe a bit more on a really tough off-road climb, but nowhere near max HR - I never seem to be able to generate enough power to tax the heart and lungs the way running does.

  3. #353
    Quote Originally Posted by bloke View Post
    I'd be in Foyler's camp wrt running. Not that I'd blanket dictate to anyone but it's certainly not for me and most everyone I know who does any bit of running is constantly carrying niggles and pains and aches. Apart from the fact that I find running interminably boring I'd be terrified that I'd do a knee or an ankle which would subsequently keep me off my bike and confine me to the couch. -You're probably right that proper research into proper technique and stretching and warm down diligence is the best approach but there's no doubt in my mind that lower impact sports such as cycling or swimming are a safer bet for the middle-aged second-winder.
    There's a lot of truth in that. And I'd definitely not be recommending running to someone who hates it or is heavy. I destroyed one of my quads on last year's Seven Sisters Skyline run and made it worse by running the Dublin Marathon a few weeks later. However, the problem with low impact sports is their negative effect on bone density and core strength, but yeah, cycling in general is a bit of a no brainer, still haven't met a cyclist who warms down, nor one who seems to suffer any issues because of it. The lack of upper body and core strength is what gets me.

    As another on the forum who was once in the obese realm, morbidly obese if I'm being honest, I definitely appreciate everyone's honesty about weight and how to shift it. I'm a qualified nutritional coach now and it's been great to see the overall improved attitude people have towards losing weight and the pyschology behind losing it and the support clients can rely on now from all over.
    Last edited by Murakami; 17-09-2020 at 02:55 PM.

  4. #354
    Quote Originally Posted by -alan- View Post

    My max HR is about 174. On a 30-40 minute run I'd try to keep it down to about 150. Find it hard to go lower as I'd be nearly walking. On the bike, I'd struggle to hold it over 130 for any length of time without the legs giving up. Maybe a bit more on a really tough off-road climb, but nowhere near max HR - I never seem to be able to generate enough power to tax the heart and lungs the way running does.
    General advice here is HTFU

  5. #355
    Ha - I knew I could rely on you lot to call it as it is

  6. #356
    Quote Originally Posted by -alan- View Post
    Agree totally on the flexibility and mobility work. Kinda tough though, because you never feel like you've had a 'proper' work out.

    My max HR is about 174. On a 30-40 minute run I'd try to keep it down to about 150. Find it hard to go lower as I'd be nearly walking. On the bike, I'd struggle to hold it over 130 for any length of time without the legs giving up. Maybe a bit more on a really tough off-road climb, but nowhere near max HR - I never seem to be able to generate enough power to tax the heart and lungs the way running does.
    Try holding an RKC plank for a minute and see if it feels like a workout, lol.

    So, re HR, I'm going to generalise here as I don't know what your situation is, but very often experienced runners struggle with the resistance element of cycling. So clearly you're fit, but your legs are fatiguing first as they aren't necessarily accustomed to the strength needed to push against the pedals' resistance over and over. For example would you be a decent climber but struggle on flatter sections where you'd need to push a bigger gear? And would you usually stick to a smallish gear and high cadence?

    You can tell me to F Off, btw, if you're not up for unsolicited advice.

  7. #357
    Quote Originally Posted by Murakami View Post
    Try holding an RKC plank for a minute and see if it feels like a workout, lol.

    So, re HR, I'm going to generalise here as I don't know what your situation is, but very often experienced runners struggle with the resistance element of cycling. So clearly you're fit, but your legs are fatiguing first as they aren't necessarily accustomed to the strength needed to push against the pedals' resistance over and over. For example would you be a decent climber but struggle on flatter sections where you'd need to push a bigger gear? And would you usually stick to a smallish gear and high cadence?

    You can tell me to F Off, btw, if you're not up for unsolicited advice.
    No - I always appreciate good advice Murakami, on anything. I'll maybe pm you, save cluttering uo the thread if that's ok ?

  8. #358
    No problem, but there’s many here with better knowledge than I. I’m kinda soitballing

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