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  • Retro vinyl.

    Not sure of im in the right section but....

    I found an original 1969 Beatles album, it's not mint and not a first pressing so I wont be buying a second home with the proceeds but it is a nice thing to have and I would like to use it, The problem is that its filthy dirty, some mould on the record and the sleeve, no major scratches on the vynil and although the cover has some creases and signs of use, it's in great condition considering the age of it. I dont have a huge collection.
    I have a few new albums given as presents and an early Pink Floyd The Wall album,
    other than that it's all dusty CDs

    What I'd eally like to know is how best to clean the vynil and the sleeve.

    Does any one have any experince of such things?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Rennwagen View Post
    What I'd eally like to know is how best to clean the vynil and the sleeve.

    Does any one have any experince of such things?
    This is a pandora's box and you can buy machines from 80 quid to over 300 quid to wash records. You can you tube many good videos of how to do it. I have tried the following two methods:

    1. Wash them in the sink like plates! Lay out a clean towel on the counter. Fill the sink with warm water with washing up liquid. Hold the records and wash it with a microfiber towel, washing around the record following the groves. Don't wipe the paper label. Then rinse off under the tap.
    Do it all quickly enough so as not to let the paper centre label get soaked. Place on the towel and dab dry it with another towel. Dry the centre label first. Then gently place in the dish rack to dry for an hour or so.

    2. Buy a record cleaning kit for about 20 quid. It should come with a liquid, microfiber towels. This is probably the easiest and I found the same end result as washing them as above.
    Last edited by markcro; 15-01-2022, 12:31 AM.
    We all stood around in a circle naked, thrusting our clinched fists in the air screaming "Jap Power!!"

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    • #3
      Thanks for that Markro,

      I realise there are various items for sale to clean records and will.probably pick something up and use youtube but what about the card sleeve?
      I thought there might be companies that do this type of work professionally?

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      • #4
        Records are tougher than you think. Just handle it with non-greasy hands and don't bang the playing surface off anything. If washing in the sink, be careful not to hit the playing surface off the tap!

        Is the sleeve shiny? Or matt surface? When cleaning shiney coated paper or card, I have always used Mr. Sheen. Spray on, don't let it sit to soak, just clean off the dirt, and then polish dry with a clean cloth.
        If the mould have stained the paper then there is nothing that you can do. I don't think anything can be done.

        I tested cleaning some really old dirty records from my folks. And while they were a vast improvement, there were still alot of pops and crackles which is dust still in the grooves. I was thinking of trying the pressure washer as a test!

        I don't know if there are companies or not that do this professionally.
        Last edited by markcro; 15-01-2022, 12:30 AM.
        We all stood around in a circle naked, thrusting our clinched fists in the air screaming "Jap Power!!"

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        • #5
          It's worth cleaning up vinyl, but I wouldn't put too much cash into it. Even well kept vinyl is going to wear out over time because it uses a contact system. The needle makes contact with the groove, so over time, the more you play it, the more it wears out. They are not a "forever" format - which was the supposed promise of CDs but even they have their issues, especially early CDs.

          Some people like collecting vinyl for its own sake, but to me the main thing is if you've vinyl that's rare and never re-issued on CD or streaming (which amazingly, most Vinyl has not) is to get a decent quality digital rip to preserve the music. I don't know if any national archive libraries are archiving all this stuff but there's so many recording in danger of disappearing forever, especially if no-one still has good master tapes. It used to be near impossible to get a good quality copy of any of William Onyeabors stuff before the Luaka Bop label spent literally years negotiating the rights. Even better known stuff that we take for granted now like the Velvet Underground that every rock bore knows as "influential" were out of print for about a decade. Could have easily slid into obscurity.
          https://www.instagram.com/diecast_1_64/

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