Header

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Plug in to latest EV news

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by Traco View Post
    Funny you mention that crank.

    I was sitting outside having a coffee in the "city" area. This thing was parked at the curb and it really makes sense. Ideal for run to coffee shop, supermarket, beach,.drop the kid to school etc. I think they have clip on plastic doors etc for rain and if it's cold wear a coat.

    There were also tricked out golf carts zipping here and there amongst Ferraris, Lambos etc etc. All were coexisting perfectly.

    Just seemed a perfect example of the right tool for the job. As far as I know they are restricted to 30mph zones.

    It also looked well spec'd and smart.
    I think the only problem with it is that golf carts smack of fat Americans who can't walk. I don't know how many events I've been to in the US where they insist on carting people around. It's ok, I can walk 200m from the car park to the destination and I can manage 20 steps up to the entrance. Or I can even walk around a golf course for that matter.
    I'm with the resistance

    Comment


    • Originally posted by DMZ View Post

      I think the only problem with it is that golf carts smack of fat Americans who can't walk. I don't know how many events I've been to in the US where they insist on carting people around. It's ok, I can walk 200m from the car park to the destination and I can manage 20 steps up to the entrance. Or I can even walk around a golf course for that matter.
      Once you get over that stigma though, Golf Carts / Neighborhood Electric Vehicles can be quite a good solution, not just for inner city use, but also for more spread out suburbs, especially if you build new developments with them in mind, like this town...

       
      https://www.instagram.com/diecast_1_64/

      Comment


      • I guess it's a variation of these A licence four wheeled moped things that exist in various parts of Europe. They are basically electric. Often used by the Uber Eats of this world with branded versions but kids can get them as well.
        I'm with the resistance

        Comment


        • Some interesting updates from Dodge.

          https://www.motortrend.com/news/dodg...ming-soon/amp/

          Comment


          •  

            Comment


            • Not often there's anything interesting in EV news, but this might interest many petrolheads of a particular era;

              https://www.topgear.com/car-news/ele...g-electric-car

              Comment


              • Could be good but I really hope it is a better and more exciting setup compared to the Extreme-E series.

                Comment


                • I don’t remember if I posted about it here but it occurred to me a while ago that the reason EVs are quite dull to drive is because of the feature that everyone goes on about as a positive: the battery in the floor and low centre of gravity. The end result of this is a heavy blob. In ICE cars you can play with the weight distribution and get a car to rotate in corners with front-engined, mid-engined, and rear-engined cars all having different characteristics that you can play with. I’ve never seen this mentioned in car reviews until this morning when I read a comparison between a Taycan Sports Turismo and a 3-series touring in Autocar (it’s in the magazine not online) where they essentially make the same point and one of the reasons why they prefer the 3-series. The 3-series, while not being exactly light these days, is also much lighter than the Taycan and eventually light wins every time. I don’t know why these types of comparisons are so rare but they’re about as interesting as car reviews get these days instead of the usual “Tesla beater” click-bait stuff.

                  I’ve had this with the I-Pace, which is incidentally a good bit lighter than a Taycan. Without looking it up I think the I-Pace is about 2,100kg and the Taycan around 2,500kg. You can hustle the I-Pace along a nice road and to be fair it handles very well particularly for an EV but it’s a one dimensional experience. Perhaps not unlike a Golf R even if you can unsettle a Golf R with trail braking and get massive oversteer into a corner in true hot hatch style. To be fair to a Golf R, though, it does handle bumpy roads much better due to being 600-odd kg lighter. It’s very hard to manage bumps in a heavy car and leads to setup compromises. Which is even more noticeable in an MX-5 as it just flows over bumps. It’s another 400-500kg lighter again.
                  I'm with the resistance

                  Comment


                  • They could... in theory, distribute battery cells around the car, but it's probably not economic or weight saving to do so as you'd need to encase them, have electronics and wiring attached. There's talk of being able to use the body itself as a battery but that's a way off and as you can imagine, probably has its own safety issues.

                    One of the things I've heard is a lot of EVs use really thick anti roll bars to counter the weight, but there's an argument they shouldn't because being so low down and the car being so stiff because of that big battery, it doesn't roll that much. Maybe something like the McLaren adaptive suspension which doesn't need roll bars would help.



                    ...or hopefully these oversized Tyco R/C packs get lighter and everybody wins.
                    https://www.instagram.com/diecast_1_64/

                    Comment


                    • I think they will artificially do something with torque vectoring or some such to solve it, perhaps.

                      Some fine thoughts from Chris Harris in this video that are EV related. It's always a good laugh when he speaks his mind.

                      I'm with the resistance

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by DMZ View Post
                        I think they will artificially do something with torque vectoring or some such to solve it, perhaps.
                        Well, your problem is roll and ride quality, torque vectoring is about traction so it's not going to solve it. The McLaren system uses hydraulics to counter roll on the fly to push up the corner that's trying to roll. It's interlinked between all four wheels.

                        Of course, they're hardly the first to try an active suspension system - Citroen did it with the Xantia Activa, Toyota/Lexus had a self levelling system on the SC400/Soarer.

                        Right at the time when Citroen should be wading in with the solution to these sort of problems, they seem to be out of ideas, or even willingness to try.
                        https://www.instagram.com/diecast_1_64/

                        Comment


                        • I was thinking more about the dullness in corners and lack of weight shift. I think the suspension problem will get sorted or has been sorted even. Porsche has definitely solved it. It may not be cheap, though. I guess VW solved it in the ID4 by making it boring to drive. That’s another way to solve it I’m sure.
                          I'm with the resistance

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by DMZ View Post
                            I was thinking more about the dullness in corners and lack of weight shift. .
                            Well that's a criticism of self levelling systems too I guess, or even race cars - very effective through the corners, but a bit of roll can be useful for us mere mortals without precognitive butt dynos.

                            It's that gentle roll round the rear axle you get from an MX5 that communicates the start of an almost-slide.

                            I don't think electronics can sort that, only weight reduction, which I'm cautiously optimistic about. It's only a single component causing the weight bloat - the battery. If we can really tip the scales on that, the weight battle could be won. The rest of the car probably has less weight than an ICE car - less transmission, driveshafts and differentials needed. e.g. you don't need a mechanical LSD if can as you say, torque vector at literally lightning speed, which a non hybrid ICE car just cannot do (there's a delay to cut power from an engine, virtually none in a motor - you aren't waiting for a combustion cycle to finish in the engine, and less mechanical linkages to the wheels).

                            I really, really like motors, I just hate heavy batteries.
                            https://www.instagram.com/diecast_1_64/

                            Comment


                            • That gentle roll has been dialled out, by the way. I never liked it much. But yes, suspension movement is good, I agree. And yes, weight is very bad, I agree.

                              Tbh the only EV that I'm currently looking at with any interest at all is the Renault Megane with the long complicated name. 1,600-ish kg. That's not bad for an EV that can travel some distance.
                              I'm with the resistance

                              Comment


                              • That's about par for the course for any mid-range car these days, so yeah, that does seem interesting. Anything to save us from a world of VAG boredom.

                                Another day, another mad 800bhp Chinese Yoke. This is the Great Wall Jialong, which literally translates as "Mecha Dragon". If they ever bring it here, I hope they translate the name to Mecha Dragon. I'd nearly buy that for the name, wait till someone is going on about their anonymous alphanumerically named cars and be able to say, yeah well screw your Bosch IDQ4 Pro+ I've got a MECHA DRAGON!!

                                It's looks are an acquired taste, but you can't say it's bland..

                                https://www.instagram.com/diecast_1_64/

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X